[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web ]
grey line
Marjorie K.M. Chan

    Advanced Search 
ohio state university
Chinese 680       

AUTUMN QUARTER 2011

CHINESE 680

Introduction to Chinese Linguistics

Professor Marjorie K.M. Chan
Dept. of East Asian Langs. & Lits.
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43210
U.S.A.
grey line back to top
COURSE: Chinese 680. Introduction to Chinese Linguistics
Call No. & Credit Hours:   5774   5 credits   U G
Prerequisites:   Chinese 103 or equivalent, or permission of instructor (2+ years of Chinese recommended)
Course page:
    http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c680.htm  (Autumn Quarter 2011)
    http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c6380.htm (Autumn Semester 2012 onwards)
TIME & PLACE: T R     01:30 - 3:18 p.m.
042 Hagerty Hall (1775 College Road)
(multimedia classroom with computer and internet connection)
OFFICE HOURS: R   3:30 - 5:00 p.m., or by appointment
Office:   362 Hagerty Hall   (1775 College Road)
Tel:        292.3619   (292.5816 for messages, 292.3225 for faxes)
E-mail:  chan.9at.symbolosu.edu
MC's Home Page:
MC's ChinaLinks:   
people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9
ChinaLinks.osu.edu
grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

TEXTBOOKS

  1. Jerry Norman. 1988. Chinese. Cambridge U. Press. [ISBN: 0-521-29653-6 (pbk)] Required. Available from SBX (1806 N. High Street, (Tel) 291.9528).
    (Note that this textbook is also required in Chinese 681. History of the Chinese Language.)
  2. Charles N. Li and Sandra A. Thompson. 1981. Mandarin Chinese: A Functional Reference Grammar. Berkeley: U. of California Press. [ISBN: 0-520-04286-7 (pbk)] Required. Available from SBX.
  3. Additional Readings:
    Additional readings are typically e-journal articles that can be retrieved from OSU Libraries' online catalog. First, go to Ohio State University Libraries <library.osu.edu>, and scroll down to “Online Journals.” Either enter a search or click on the link to "Online Journals List" to find the relevant e-journal title. Alternatively, go to OhioLINK's Electronic Journal Center (EJC) to locate the e-journal. Other readings, scanned to PDF format by Electronic Reserves, will be available for downloading from Carmen.osu.edu under the current course. Additional readings will be made available during the course.
Thompson (Main) Library Reserve and Electronic Reserves:
Some reference books will be placed in Closed Reserve at Thompson (Main) Library (loan periods may vary) during the quarter, among them being the two textbooks (4-hour loans). (Note: Reserved materials in Closed Reserve are for the specified quarter only.)
Check Ohio State University Libraries <library.osu.edu> for an online list of books and readings placed on Reserve for Chinese 680. Under FIND in the menubar, select COURSE RESERVES, and then choose either "Print Reserves by Course" or "Print Reserves by Professor." Readings in PDF format prepared by OSU Libraries for e-Reserve can be retrieved under this course in Carmen.
grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course investigates the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, lexicon, and writing system of the Chinese language. Also covered briefly are some topics relating language to cognition, culture, and society.

grey line

COURSE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED OUTCOMES

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students, and upper-level undergraduate students in Chinese language and literature, with some basic knowledge of the structure of Mandarin (modern standard) Chinese. The course investigates the phonology and grammar of the language from a functional — as well as cognitive — perspective. A few readings have also been included for more detailed study of select topics. In addition, the course examines the Chinese writing system, and introduces some sociolinguistic and cognitive linguistic issues for discussion. This course serves to prepare students for more advanced courses in Chinese linguistics, from theoretical as well as pedagogical perspectives. Students are expected at the end of the course to have gained a basic knowledge of the linguistic structure of the Chinese as well as some information on such topics as the Chinese writing system. The student should be able to use that foundation to proceed to advanced graduate courses and graduate seminars in Chinese linguistics. A student with a strong Chinese language background should also be able to apply knowledge gained in the course to conduct more advance research on linguistic issues.

grey line

COURSE CONTENT

The course will be conducted through lectures combined with class discussions of assigned readings, individual and small-group assignments in class, and students' presentation of homework assignments and their individual research project.

grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. Read and reflect on all assigned readings prior to class lectures and discussion.
  2. Attend class regularly, and participate actively in class discussions and individual/group activities.
  3. Submit three homework assignments (each about 5 pages (about 4 pages for undergraduate students), double-spaced, not including references).[1]
  4. For the term paper project:
  5. All course assignments in digital format are to be uploaded to your Dropbox in Carmen.osu.edu under Chinese 680.
[1] These may be a combination of research-supported reactions papers and corpus-based, or experimental-design-based, written responses to specific questions from the instructor based on the readings. The assignments should be submitted in hardcopy format in class on the due date, in addition to submission of a digital copy (DOC(X) (MS Word) or PDF format) in Carmen.osu.edu.

[2] Prepare a digital file in PowerPoint format for submission in Carmen.osu.edu and for use in the class presentation. (Be sure to bring a backup copy of the file with you to class.)

[3] Submit the term paper in hardcopy format and in digital format. (If some other digital format is used, be sure to discuss it with the instructor first.)

DISABILITY SERVICES

Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs. The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (Tel: 292.3307. TDD: 292.0901)

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY (ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT)

Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities. Failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in OSU's Code of Student Conduct (revised 7 December 2007) may constitute “Academic Misconduct.” OSU's Code of Student Conduct (section 3335-23-04 Prohibited conduct) defines as academic misconduct “[a]ny activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the university, or subvert the educational process.”

Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, possession of unauthorized materials during an examination, and submission of the same work for credit in two (or more) courses. Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an “excuse” for academic misconduct; hence, be sure to review the sections dealing with academic misconduct in the Code of Student Conduct.

Be sure also to read the University's Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity and/or the Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity (from Northwestern U.). The University's policy on academic misconduct will be enforced in accordance with Faculty Rule 3335-5-54, and all alleged cases of academic misconduct will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs' Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) for resolution. In addition, graduate students should be familiar with the Graduate School's Graduate Student Code of Research and Scholarly Conduct, which is included in the Graduate School Handbook. (PDF file). Students with questions concerning the University's policies or questions concerning academic or research misconduct are encouraged to ask the instructor any time during the quarter.
[Note: OSU's Center for the Study of Teaching and Writing (CSTW) provides a definition of plagiarism together with Basic Citation Rules and Examples, including use of direct quotes versus paraphrasing, etc. Also, OSU Libraries' Knowledge Bank has a set of short, online videos on Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism.]

grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

GRADING

There will be no midterm or final examination. Grading will be based on:

Attendance 10%
Class discussions/participation       20%
Homework assignments (3) 30%
Research project (all phases) 40%
------
100%
grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

SCHEDULE

Classes are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
This is a preliminary schedule. Activities and reading selections may be modified when the quarter begins.

Next Schedule back to top WEEK 1

Note: Discussion of reading selections begins on September 27, but do read ahead if you have purchased your textbooks.

9/22   Orientation and Introduction
  • Carmen course management system; library facilities; software for linguistic research (concordancers, transcribers, speech-analysis software, etc.).
  • Read ahead for next week's classes
  • Suppl. (Optional) Readings: Chan (2002, 2003)

Next Prev back to top WEEK 2
09/27   The Chinese Language: Dialects, Standards, and Language Shifts 09/29  Articulatory Phonetics: Place and Manner of Articulation

Explore some of the links below before class:


Next Prev back to top WEEK 3
10/04   Phonetics, Phonology, and Variation
  • IPA charts, romanization charts, etc.
  • Sound files, waveforms, F0 tracings, etc.

*   *   *   *   *

Double Ninth Festival (重陽節)
(10.05.2011)

10/06   In-Class Recording and Speech Analysis


Due: Homework Assignment 1.


Next Prev back to top WEEK 4
10/11   Typological Description and Grammar
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.2
    - Norman, Ch.7.1-7.5
10/13   Word Structure: Spoken and Signed Language
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.3 (skim)
    - Chan and Xu (2008)
    - Suppl. Readings: Tai (2005, 2008)

Next Prev back to top WEEK 5
10/18   Linguistic Categorization, Metaphor and Language
  • Readings (selections from the following):
    - Malt et al. (2003)
    - Kuo and Sera (2009)
    - Yu (2000, 2003, 2004, 2008)
    - Jing-Schmidt (2008)

Due: Homework Assignment 2.

10/20   Simple Declarative Sentences
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.4
    - Norman, Ch.7.6

Next Prev back to top WEEK 6
10/25   Temporal Reference and the Two Le's
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.6.1 & 7.1
    - Suppl. Reading: Chan (1980)
10/27   Coverbs, Negation and Verb Copying
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.9, 12 & 13

Next Prev back to top WEEK 7
11/01   Ba and Bei Constructions
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.15 & 16

    1:30 p.m. -- Professor Zhiguo Xie (DEALL): “'Affectedness' in the Mandarin BA construction"

11/03   Imperatives and Questions
  • Readings:
    - Li & Thompson, Ch.14 & 18

Due: One-page project proposal and select references.


Next Prev back to top WEEK 8
11/08    Pragmatics and Sentence-Final Particles

Due: Homework Assignment 3.

11/10   Language Use in Context: Speech Acts and Spoken Discourse

  • Readings (selections from the following):
    - Wang & Tsai (2005)
    - Wang (2008)
    - Su (2008)
    - Tang and Zhang (2009)

Next Prev back to top WEEK 9
11/15   The Chinese Script and China's Language Policy
  • Readings:
    - Coulmas (1989)
    - Norman, Ch. 10 (background reading: Ch. 7.7)
    - Suppl. readings: Boltz (1996), Rohsenow (2004)
11/17   Dialect Writing, Secret Writing and Internet Language
  • Readings:
    - Chan (2005)
    - Su (2004)
    - Suppl. Reading: Snow (1993)

  • Documentary excerpt on Nü Shu (女書/女书 female writing). (Also relate to the 2011 film, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan.)

Next Prev back to top WEEK 10
11/22   Putonghua, Local Speech, and Language Attitudes
  • Readings:
    - Lai (2005, 2007)
    - Suppl. readings: Blum (2004), Zhou (2001), Liao (2008)
11/24   (No Class)

Thanksgiving Day


Next Prev back to top WEEK 11
11/29   Student Presentations
 
12/01   Student Presentations

Prev back to top WEEK 12:   EXAM WEEK

Term paper due: Monday, 5 December 2011, 5:00 p.m.

Research Paper:
Submit (1) a hardcopy in the instructor's mailbox in DEALL, 398 Hagerty Hall,
and (2) a digital copy in the Dropbox in Carmen.

Graduating Seniors/Grads:
Submit a digital copy to the Carmen Dropbox
by Friday, 2 December 2011, 12:00 noon.
(An optional hardcopy is due by Friday, 2 December 2011, 5:00 pm, in 398 Hagerty Hall.)


grey line[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]

READINGS

TEXTBOOKS (Specific chapters are assigned.)
  1. Norman, Jerry. 1988. Chinese. Cambridge U. Press. [PL1075 .N67 1988]
  2. Li, Charles N. and Sandra A. Thompson. 1981. Mandarin Chinese: A Functional Reference Grammar. Berkeley: U. of California Press. [PL1107 .L5 1981]

ADDITIONAL READINGS

Retrieve e-journal articles at OSU Libraries (click under Quicklinks to select “Online Journals List”) or go to OhioLINK's Electronic Journal Center (EJC) to locate the e-journal. (At the EJC website, one can also click “Search” at the top menubar to search the database for the specific e-journal article via searching by “Any Field” (default setting), “Article Title”, “Author Name”, etc.) Readings scanned to PDF format by Electronic Reserves for this quarter's offering of Chinese 680 are available for downloading at Carmen. Other readings will be made available during the course.

(For reference: Charts, figures, tables.)

  1. Chan, Marjorie K.M. 2005. Cantonese opera and the growth and spread of vernacular written Cantonese in the twentieth century. In: Qian Gao (editor), Proceedings of the Seventeenth North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics (NACCL-17). Los Angeles: GSIL Publications, University of Southern California. Pages 1-18. [See PDF file (prepublication, camera-ready file with pagination and bookmarks added and a few typos corrected).]
  2. Chan, Marjorie K.M. and Wang Xu. 2008. Modality effects revisited: Iconicity in Chinese Sign Language. In: Marjorie K.M. Chan and Hana Kang (editors), Proceedings of the 20th North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics (NACCL-20). Volume 1. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University. Pages 343-360. [ PDF file (277 KB) -- CSL and TSL video clips (archived at OSU's Media Manager) ]
  3. Coulmas, Florian. 1989. The Writing Systems of the World. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, Inc. (Excerpt: Chapter 6, An alternative to the alphabet: The Chinese writing system, pages 91-110.)
  4. Jing-Schmidt, Zhuo. 2008. Much mouth much tongue: Chinese metonymies and metaphors of verbal behaviour. Cognitive Linguistics 19.2: 241-282. [OSU e-journal article]
  5. Kuo, Jenny Yi-chun, and Maria D. Sera. 2009. Classifier effects on human categorization: The role of shape classifiers in Mandarin Chinese. Journal of East Asian Linguistics 18:1-19. [OSU e-journal article]
  6. Lai, Mee-ling. 2005. Language attitudes of the first postcolonial generation in Hong Kong secondary schools. Language in Society 34: 363-388.
  7. Lai, Mee-ling. 2007. Exploring language stereotypes in post-colonial Hong Kong through the matched-guise test. Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 17.2: 225–244. [OSU e-journal article]
  8. Li, David C. S. 2006. Chinese as a lingua franca in Greater China. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 26: 149-176. [OSU e-journal article]
  9. Malt, Barbara C., Steven A. Sloman, and Silvia P. Gennari. 2003. Universality and language specificity in object naming. Journal of Memory and Language 49: 20-42. [OSU e-journal article]
  10. Sandel, Todd L., Wen-Yu Chao, and Chung-Hui Liang. 2006. Language shift and language accommodation across family generations in Taiwan. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 27.2: 126-147.
  11. Su, Hsi-Yao. 2004. Mock Taiwanese-accented Mandarin in the internet community in Taiwan: The interaction between technology, linguistic practice, and language ideologies. In: Philip Levine and Ron Scollon (editors), Discourse & Technology: Multimodal Discourse Analysis. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press. Pages 59-70.
  12. Su, Hsi-Yao. 2008. What does it mean to be a girl with qizhi?: Refinement, gender and language ideologies in contemporary Taiwan. Journal of Sociolinguistics 12/3: 334–358.
  13. Tang, Chen-Hsin and Grace Qiao Zhang. 2009. A contrastive study of compliment responses among Australian English and Mandarin Chinese speakers. Journal of Pragmatics 41.2: 325-345. [OSU e-journal article]
  14. Wang, Yu-Fang and Pi-Hua Tsai. 2005. Hao in spoken Chinese discourse: Relevance and coherence. Language Sciences 27: 215-243. [OSU e-journal article]
  15. Wang, Yu-Fang. 2008. Beyond negation—the roles of meiyou and bushi in Mandarin conversation. Language Sciences 30: 679-713. [OSU e-journal article]
  16. Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2005. 'There is more here than meets the eye!': The use of final ou in two sequential positions in Mandarin Chinese conversation. Journal of Pragmatics 37: 967-995. [OSU e-journal article]
  17. Yu, Ning. 2000. Figurative uses of finger and palm in Chinese and English. Metaphor and Symbol 15.3: 159-175. [OSU e-journal article]
  18. Yu, Ning. 2003. Metaphor, body, and culture: The Chinese understanding of gallbladder and courage. Metaphor and Symbol 18.1: 13-31. [OSU e-journal article]
  19. Yu, Ning. 2004. The eyes for sight and mind. Journal of Pragmatics 36: 663-686. [OSU e-journal article]
  20. Yu, Ning. 2008. Metaphor from body and culture. In: Raymond W. Gibbs (editor), The Cambridge Handbook of Metaphor and Thought, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Pages 247-261.
  21. Zhang, Qing. 2005. A Chinese yuppie in Beijing: Phonological variation and the construction of a new professional identity. Language in Society 34: 431-466. [OSU e-journal article]
grey line
[ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
grey line

SOME SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS AND REFERENCES


  • Beijing Daxue (北京大学中国语言文学系语言学教研室编). 1995. Hanyu Fangyan Cihui (汉语方言词汇). Second edition. Beijing: Yuwen Chubanshe.
  • Blum, Susan D. 2004. Good to hear: Using the trope of standard to find one's way in a sea of linguistic diversity. In: Minglang Zhou (editor), Language Policy in the People's Republic of China: Theory and Practice Since 1949. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pages 123-141.
  • Biq, Yung-O. 2004. Construction, reanalysis, and stance: 'V yi ge N' and variations in Mandarin Chinese. Journal of Pragmatics 36:1655–1672. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Boltz, William G. 1996. Early Chinese Writing. In: The World's Writing Systems. Edited by Peter T. Daniels and William Bright. New York: Oxford University Press. Pages 191-199.
  • Chan, Marjorie K.M. 1980. Temporal reference in Mandarin Chinese: an analytical-semantic approach to the study of the morphemes le 了, zai 在, zhe 着, and ne 呢." Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 15.3:33-79. [See PDF file (.42 MB)]
  • Chan, Marjorie K.M. 2002. Concordancers and concordances: Tools for Chinese language teaching and research. Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 37.2: 1-58. [See PDF file (2 pages onto 1, 1.6 MB)]
  • Chan, Marjorie K.M. 2003. The digital age and speech technology for Chinese language teaching and learning. Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 38.2: 49-86. [See PDF file (2 pages onto 1, 1.9 MB)]
  • Chang-Smith, Meiyun. 2000. Empirical evidence for prototypes in linguistic categorization revealed in Mandarin numeral classifiers. Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 35.2: 19-52.
  • Chao, Yuen Ren. 1968. A Grammar of Spoken Chinese. Berkeley: University of California Press. (Excerpts: Chapter 1.3.6. "Stress", Chapter 1.3.7. "Intonation," and Chapter 8.5. "Particles."]
  • Chen, Ping. 1999. Modern Chinese: History and Sociolinguistics. Cambridge, U.K.; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Duanmu, San. 2007. The Phonology of Standard Chinese. Second edition. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Ettner, Charles. 2002. In Chinese, men and women are equal - or - women and men are equal? In: Marlis Hellinger and Hadumod Bussmann (eds.), Gender Across Languages: The Linguistic Representation of Women and Men. Volume 2. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Pub. Co. Pages 29-55.
  • Gao, Liwei. 2008. Language change in progress: Evidence from Computer-Mediated Communication. In: Marjorie K.M. Chan and Hana Kang (editors), Proceedings of the 20th North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics (NACCL-20). Volume 1. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University. Pages 361-377.
  • Gilliland, Joshua. 2006. Language Attitudes and Ideologies in Shanghai, China. M.A. thesis, Ohio State University.
  • Guo, Longsheng. 2004. The relationship between Putonghua and Chinese dialects. In: Minglang Zhou (ed.), Language Policy in the People's Republic of China: Theory and Practice Since 1949. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pages 45-53.
  • Hong, Wei. 2002. How does power affect Chinese politeness? Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 37.2: 59-73.
  • Lan, H.R. 1994. Her beauty is EATABLE: a culturo-linguistic study. Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association XXIX.3: 79-97.
  • Li, Chris Wen-Chao. 2004. Conflicting notions of language purity: the interplay of archaising, ethnographic, reformist, elitist and xenophobic purism in the perception of Standard Chinese. Language and Communication 24.2: 97-133. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Li, Fang-kuei. 1973. Languages and dialects of China. Journal of Chinese Linguistics 1.1.1-13. (A condensed version, which first appeared in 1937 in the Chinese Year Book, Shanghai, was the first scientific classification of the Chinese language into dialect groups, together with other language families spoken in China.)
  • Liao, Chao-chih and Mary I. Bresnahan. 1996. A contrastive pragmatic study on American English and Mandarin refusal strategies. Language Science 18.3-4: 703-727. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Liao, Silvie. 2008. A perceptual dialect study of Taiwan Mandarin: Language attitudes in the era of political battle. In: Marjorie K.M. Chan and Hana Kang (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics (NACCL-20). Volume 1. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University. Pages 391-408.
  • Liew, Kai Khiun. 2003. Limited pidgin-type patois? Policy, language, technology, identity and the experience of Canto-pop in Singapore. Popular Music 22.2: 217-233. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Lin, Yen-Hwei. 2007. The Sounds of Chinese. Cambridge, UK; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Book and audio format of examples on CD.)
  • Rohsenow, John S. 2004. Fifty years of script and written language reform in the PRC: The genesis of the Language Law of 2001. In: Minglang Zhou (editor), Language Policy in the People's Republic of China: Theory and Practice Since 1949. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pages 21-43.
    [For an online copy of the original Chinese version of the language law, see the GB-encoded webpage, 中华人民共和国国家通用语言文字法 (教育部, moe.gov.cn) (Other online copies: URL 2 at 新华网, news.xinhuanet.com, URL 3 at 人民日报, people.com.cn) English translation (at gov.cn)]
  • Saillard, Claire. 2004. On the promotion of Putonghua in China: How a standard language becomes a vernacular. In: Minglang Zhou (ed.), Language Policy in the People's Republic of China: Theory and Practice Since 1949. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pages 163-176.
  • Sandel, Todd L. 2003. Linguistic capital in Taiwan: The KMT's Mandarin language policy and its perceived impact on language practices of bilingual Mandarin and Tai-gi speakers. Language in Society 32: 523-551. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Shen, Xiao-nan. 1989. Interplay of the four citation tones and intonation in Mandarin Chinese. Journal of Chinese Linguistics 17.1: 61-74.
  • Snow, Donald B. 1993. "Chinese dialect as written language: The cases of Taiwanese and Cantonese." Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 4.1: 15-30.
  • Sun, Chaofen. 2006. Chinese: A Linguistic Introduction. Cambridge, UK; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sun, Hao. 2004. Opening moves in informal Chinese telephone conversations. Journal of Pragmatics 36.8: 1429-1465. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Swihart, De-An Wu. 2003. The two Mandarins: Putonghua and Guoyu. Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 38.3: 103-118.
  • Tai, James H.-Y. 2005. Modality effects: Iconicity in Taiwan Sign Language. In: Dah-an Ho and Ovid J. L. Tzeng (editors), POLA FOREVER: Festschrift in Honor of Professor William S-Y. Wang on his 70TH Birthday. Taipei: Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica. Pages 19-36. [See PDF file (pre-publication copy) at J. Tai's publication webpage (Chinese URL)]
  • Tai, James H.-Y. 2008. The nature of Chinese grammar: Perspectives from Sign Language. In: Marjorie K.M. Chan and Hana Kang (editors), Proceedings of the 20th North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics (NACCL-20). Volume 1. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University. Pages 21-40.
  • Wang, Yu-Fang and Pi-Hua Tsai. 2007. Textual and contextual contrast connection: A study of Chinese contrastive markers across different text types. Journal of Pragmatics 39: 1775-1815. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Wang, Yu-fang, Pi-hua Tsai, and Meng-ying Ling. 2007. From informational to emotive use: meiyou (`no') as a discourse marker in Taiwan Mandarin conversation. Discourse Studies 9.5: 677-701. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Ye, Lei. 1995. Complimenting in Mandarin Chinese. In: Gabriele Kasper (editor), Pragmatics of Chinese as Native and Target Language. Honlulu: U. of Hawaii Press. Pages 207-302.
  • Zhang, Qing. 2007. Cosmopolitanism and linguistic capital in China: Language, gender and the transition to a globalized market economy in Beijing. In: Bonnie McElhinny (ed.), Words, Worlds and Material Girls: Language, Gender, Global Economies. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Pages 403–422.
  • Zhao, Shouhui and Richard B. Baldauf, Jr. 2008. Planning Chinese Characters: Reaction, Evolution or Revolution? Dordrecht: Springer. [OSU web e-book - use online or download the PDF files]
  • Zhou, Minglang. 2001. The spread of Putonghua and language attitude changes in Shanghai and Guangzhou, China. Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 11.2: 231-253.
  • Zhou, Minglang. 2001. Language policy and reforms of writing systems for minority languages in China. Written Language & Literacy 4.1.31-65. [OSU e-journal article]
  • Zhu, Hua, Wei Li, and Yuan Qian. 2000. The sequential organisation of gift-offering and acceptance in Chinese. Journal of Pragmatics 32: 81-103. [OSU e-journal article]

  • ... more to be added later ...
  • grey line
    [ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]
    grey line

    SOME ONLINE RESOURCES

    grey line
    [ Gen. Info | Txtbks | Desc. | Stud. Resp. | Grading | Sched. | Readings | Suppl. Rdgs | Web | Top ]

    Top
    MC's ChinaLinks
    [ MC's Home | DEALL Home ]
    [ The Ohio State University ]
    grey line cardinal To cite this page:
    Marjorie Chan's Chinese 680: Introduction to Chinese Linguistics (Autumn 2011)
    <http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c680.htm> [Accessed   <DATE> ]

    Originally created on 6 June 1996; revised since for each course offering, with the most recent major revision for Autumn Quarter 2011.
    Last update: 23 June 2012.

    The photo used as the logo was originally from the website of the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden (中山公園). This garden, which is located in Vancouver Chinatown, Canada, and just half a block from my mother's dwelling, is the only full-sized classical Chinese garden outside China. Although built in the 1980's, it used the ancient techniques of the originals that were built in the Ming dynasty (1368-1644).

    Copyright © 1996-201x Marjorie K.M. Chan. All rights reserved on course syllabus and online materials developed for the course. If you have difficulty accessing any portion of this web page or need the information in an alternative format, please contact the instructor at <chan.9at.symbolosu.edu>.

    URL:     http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c680.htm
    grey line