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Marjorie K.M. Chan

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ohio state university
Chinese 674 - Chinese Opera       

AUTUMN QUARTER 2011

Chinese 674
CHINESE OPERA

Professor Marjorie K.M. Chan
Dept. of East Asian Langs. & Lits.
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43210
U.S.A.
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COURSE: Chinese 674. Chinese Opera
Class No. & Credit Hours:   26599   5 credits.   U G
Prerequisites:   No prerequisites
Course page:   http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c674.htm
Course page (semester system): http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c5474.htm
TIME & PLACE: M W  12:30 - 2:18 pm   359 Hagerty Hall   (1775 College Road)
(multimedia classroom with computer and internet connection)
a scene from 'Qiujiang'
OFFICE HOURS: R  3:30 - 5:00 p.m., or by appointment
Office:   362 Hagerty Hall   (1775 College Road)
Tel:        292.3619   (292.5816 for messages, 292.3225 for faxes)
E-mail:   chan.9at.symbolosu.edu
MC's Home Page:
MC's ChinaLinks:   
people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9
ChinaLinks.osu.edu
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TEXTBOOKS

textbook 2 textbook 1
  1. Bao, Chengjie and Juan Cao. 2002. Fascinating Stage Arts. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [Paperback; ISBN: 7-119-03053-1] [This book is catalogued in the OSU Libraries under a single author (Bao, Changjie); translators: He, Jun et al.] [PN2876.B37 X813 2003] Note: This textbook was originally required, but is out of stock at the publisher and is no longer available. The textbook is available on 4-hour loan from Closed Reserve at Thompson (Main) Library. Additional copies will be made available from the instructor.
  2. Yi, Bian (compiler). 2005. Peking Opera: The Cream of Chinese Culture. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [Paperback; ISBN: 7-119-03697-1] [PN2876.B37 P45 2005] Note: Neither the original textbook (Xu 2003) nor the currently selected one are available any longer from the publisher. Yi (2005) is available on 4-hour loan from Closed Reserve at Thompson (Main) Library. Additional copies will be made available from the instructor.
  3. Additional Readings and Other Resources:
    These will be made available during the quarter. (See Readings list.)
Thompson (Main) Library Close Reserve and Electronic Reserves:
Library books that contain the required readings, as well as the two textbooks, are placed on Close Reserve at Main Library. (Note: Reserved materials for a given course are listed online for the current quarter only.) A number of reference books are also on Reserve at Main Library. Additional required readings in PDF format from E-Reserve and other sources will be made available in Carmen.
Note: Check Ohio State University Libraries <library.osu.edu> for an online list of books and readings placed on Reserve and on E-Reserves for Chinese 674. Under Quicklinks, select either “Reserves by Course” or “Reserves by Professor”. E-journal articles assigned for reading in the course can be retrieved by going to EJC: OhioLINK Electronic Journal Center and searching for the specific e-journal article for downloading.
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

An introduction to Chinese opera as traditional culture, dramatic literature, and performing art; study of select plays and recorded stage performances; multimedia-based, illustrated discussions of various aspects of the theatre.
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COURSE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED OUTCOMES

This culture course, taught in English with no prerequisites, is an introduction to China's long and rich operatic tradition. While the most famous, and preeminent, form of Chinese opera today is Peking opera (Beijing opera), other forms — including Kunqu opera (one of UNESCO's "Masterpieces of Human Oral Cultural Heritage") and various regional operas — will also be introduced for comparison and analysis. The course will explore Chinese opera and its historical roots — in both popular and elite culture — as well as various aspects of stagecraft (e.g., music, singing, face-painting, gestures, props, etc.) through reading and examination of some representative operas and their performances.

Students are expected at the end of the course to have gained a basic knowledge of the history and performance traditions of Chinese opera, and be able to discourse critically on some aspects of that cultural tradition.
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COURSE CONTENT

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This course studies the origins of Chinese opera, its historical importance in Chinese society and popular culture, well-known plots and their literary and historical (or semi-historical and folk legend) sources, famous dramatists and their scripts, well-known performers, some local traditions among the nearly 400 different regional operas sung in local dialects, and last but not least, the stage arts — role types, training for those roles (including acrobatics and martial arts training), costumes appropriate for specific role types, gestures and mime, dance, stage and other props, musical instruments, arias and tunes, etc.

The course will examine Chinese opera using both print media and multimedia resources. Print media materials are readings that include studies on the topic, as well as synopses and select plays translated into English. Multimedia materials consist of documentaries on Chinese opera and opera performers, in addition to excerpts of recorded stage performances (supplemented by film productions). Class discussion covers both print and multimedia resources used in the course.

Xiao He The course takes a theme-based organization of the Chinese opera stories in introducing stage productions not only from Peking opera, but also from Kunqu and some regional varieties (Yue opera (Zhejiang Province), Cantonese opera, huangmei (yellow plum) opera, Ping opera (sung in colloquial Mandarin), Chaozhou opera, etc.). As Chinese opera plots are traditionally divided into military (battles and other military exploits) and civil (romance, court cases, etc.), representative operas from both types of plots will be studied. The examination of various aspects of Chinese opera — including role types, make-up, costume and props, color choice in make-up and costumes, gesture and mime, singing, music, instrumentation, scenery, etc. — will be integrated into this introductory study of Chinese opera. Also available for the course are some colorful Chinese opera costumes, accessories, and props, as well as musical instruments that were donated by Professor David Ch'en, who had taught this course regularly before his retirement.

This course will be conducted through lectures, discussion of readings, viewing and discussion of video resources, individual and small-group assignments in class, and students' presentation of their homework assignments and final project. Computer technology will be integrated into the course (demo of frame-capture, digitizing, video-editing, etc.). All class assignments, e-Reserve readings, etc., will be in Carmen.osu.edu for retrieval. Some multimedia materials will be accessible online to students at the Media Manager, hosted and maintained by Ohio State's College of Arts and Sciences.
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STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Xiang Yu - hegemon king
  1. Read and reflect on all assigned readings prior to class lectures and discussion.
  2. Attend class regularly, and participate actively in class discussions of readings (including in-class reading of plots and synopses) and videorecorded materials.
  3. Submit two homework assignments and a final project.

    The two homework assignments may be reaction papers and critical analyses (about 3-4 double-spaced pages) based primarily on the textbooks, readings, and videorecordings, or some other individual or small-group mini-project, such review, etc., of online and digital Chinese opera resources. The second homework assignment may be a small multimedia-based project. Written assignments are to be submitted in hardcopy format in class, with a digital version (e.g., DOC(X), PDF, HTML, PowerPoint, Prezi, etc.) uploaded to the Dropbox in Carmen.osu.edu (or presented as group assignments in CarmenWiki, or some other means of collaborative projects).

  4. For the final project:
    1. Turn in a one-page, double-spaced, project proposal with select references by Week 7. Submit a digital copy to the Dropbox for the course in Carmen.osu.edu. (In the case of a project using CarmenWiki or some other online, collaborative project, submit a small text file providing the name of the project, a short paragraph description of the project, and the names of the project participants.)
    2. Present an oral version of the final project (in PowerPoint and/or multimedia format) at the end of the quarter. Submit the digital file to the Dropbox in Carmen, or on DVD disc if the file is large.
    3. For research papers, submit the paper in hardcopy and digital format (about 12 double-spaced pages (or about 10 double-spaced pages for undergraduate students), not including references and images, if any). Submit a digital copy to the Dropbox in Carmen, or on DVD disc if the file is too large for easy uploading to Carmen. For anyone planning to work in a non-print format for the final project — as an individual project or a group project — such as producing a short documentary film or some other form of multimedia project (e.g., creating a webpage or small website, a project using CarmenWiki, etc.), a performance-based project, etc., consult with the instructor to determine grade assignment for the project.)

DISABILITY SERVICES

Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs. The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (Tel: 292.3307. TDD: 292.0901)

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY (ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT)

Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities. Failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in OSU's Code of Student Conduct may constitute “Academic Misconduct.” OSU's Code of Student Conduct (section 3335-23-04 Prohibited conduct) defines as academic misconduct “[a]ny activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the university, or subvert the educational process.” Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, possession of unauthorized materials during an examination, and submission of the same work for credit in two (or more) courses. Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an “excuse” for academic misconduct; hence, be sure to review the sections dealing with academic misconduct in the Code of Student Conduct. Be sure also to read the University's Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity and/or the Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity (from Northwestern U.). The University's policy on academic misconduct will be enforced in accordance with Faculty Rule 3335-5-54, and all alleged cases of academic misconduct will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs' Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) for resolution. In addition, graduate students should be familiar with the Graduate Student Code of Research and Scholarly Conduct (pdf). Students with questions concerning the University's policies or questions concerning academic or research misconduct are encouraged to ask the instructor any time during the quarter.
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GRADING

There will be no midterm or final examination. Grading will be based on:

Attendance 10%
Class discussions/participation 20%
Assignments (2) 30%
Final project (all phases) 40%
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100%

Final grades are not placed on the bell curve, but will be calculated based on the individual student's earned percentage for the course:

A  (93%)      B+(88%)      C+(78%)      D+(68%)      E  (below 60%)
A- (90%)     B  (83%)     C  (73%)    D  (60%)         
        B-(80%)     C-(70%)               
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SCHEDULE

Classes are held on Mondays and Wednesdays.
This is a preliminary schedule. Readings and activities may be revised when the quarter begins.
Opera selections may be modified subject to class interest and availability of videos, English translations, etc.


Next Schedule back to top WEEK 1.   INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE OPERA
 
9/21   Orientation and Introduction
  • Videos & Discussion:
    • What is Chinese Opera?
    • 600 Years of Kunqu Opera (short excerpt)
    • A Primer to Peking Opera

  • Background Readings:
    • Bao & Cao (2002), Ch. I & II
    • Yi (2005), Foreword

  • Presentation of one or more (film and/or stage) opera excerpts from Peking opera, Kunqu and/or regional operas — e.g., The Perfumed Handkerchief (Xiang Luopa); The Butterfly Lovers (Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai); Dream of the Red Chamber (Honglou Meng); Monkey Borrows the Magic Fan (Jie Shan); The Spider's Silk Cave (Pan Si Dong); The Girl Who Marries a Princess (Nü Fuma); Third Sister Liu (Liu San Jie); Cao Cao · Guan Yu · Diao Chan (loosely based on Romance of the Three Kingdoms); etc.

Next Prev back to top WEEK 2.  KUNQU & PEKING OPERA: MING, QING & REPUBLICAN ERA
9/26
  • Zheng (200-), Ch. 1

  • Read ahead for Wednesday's class.

  • Video excerpts from documentaries and performances of Kunqu opera (e.g., Peony Pavilion (Mudan Ting); Peach Blossom Fan (Taohua Shan); Zhong Kui's Earthly Mission (Zhong Kui Jia Mei (Zhong Kui Marries off his Sister), etc.).
9/28
  • Bao & Cao (2002), Ch. IV (re Peking opera performers)
  • Goldstein (2007), Intro., Ch. 1 & 7

  • Video excerpt: Performers, their lives and representative operas – Mei Lanfang and Cheng Yanqiu

Next Prev back to top WEEK 3.   REGIONAL OPERA: REPUBLICAN PERIOD AND BEYOND
10/03
  • Jiang (2009), Introduction ~ skim
  • Jiang (2009), Ch. 1-2

  • Video excerpts from documentaries, films (e.g., Two Stage Sisters (Wutai Jiemei)), and performances on Shanghai Yue opera, Huangmei (yellow plum) opera, etc.

  • General discussion on regional opera traditions present and past, North American context, etc.
10/05
  • Siu (1997), Ch. 2
  • Bao & Cao (2002), Ch. IV (re regional opera performers)

  • Yang (1958), The Runaway Maid
    - (a.k.a. Searching the Academy (Sou Shu Yuan))
    . Excerpt for in-class reading, viewing and discussion to observe the Double Ninth Festival.

Double Ninth Festival (重陽節)


Next Prev back to top WEEK 4.   CHINESE OPERA STAGECRAFT
10/10  
  • Bao & Cao (2002), Ch. III & V
  • Read Yi (2005, pp. 27-98) ~ skim

  • Video excerpts for viewing and discussion

  • (Note: This week's readings will also serve as reference sources during the remainder of the quarter.)
10/12  
  • Zheng (200-), Ch. 3
  • Bonds (2008), Ch. 1 & 2

  • Scott (1983) - suppl. (optional) rdg.

  • Video excerpts for viewing and discussion

Due: Assignment 1


Next Prev back to top WEEK 5.   THEME 1 — FLIRTING, COURTSHIP & VIRTUOUS DEEDS
10/17  
  • Scott (1975), Picking Up the Jade Bracelet

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts in Peking opera and regional opera versions
10/19  
  • Hung (1971), The Price of Wine
  • Hung (1974), The Jewel Bag

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts in Peking opera and regional opera versions

  • Synopses from other representative operas and video excerpts for viewing and discussion

Next Prev back to top WEEK 6.   THEME 2 — VENGEANCE, RIGHTEOUSNESS & SACRIFICE
10/24  
  • Yang and Yang (1956), The Fisherman's Revenge

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts from this Peking opera

  • Other video excerpts of operas with theme of vengeance and righteousness (e.g., Wu Song, etc.).
10/26  
  • The Orphan of Zhao
    - Reading of synopsis, etc., and viewing of excerpts; comparison with other genres including Shaw Bros' huangmei opera film version and Chen Kaige's film production, Zhao Shi Gu'er, or Sacrifice (2010)

    - Mou (2009) (optional)

  • Other video excerpts of operas with theme of courage and sacrifice (e.g., Yang family generals, etc.).

Next Prev back to top WEEK 7.   THEME 3 — COURT TRIALS & THE QUEST FOR JUSTICE
10/31  
  • Scott (1975), A Girl Setting Out for Trial
    (Suppl. reading: Hung (1971), The Faithful Harlot (Yu Tang Chun))

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts from the opera.

Due: Assignment 2

11/02  
  • Yang and Yang (1958), The Forsaken Wife (Qin Xianglian)

  • Scott (1969), Fifteen Strings of Cash

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts from the two operas based on opera performances, film version, etc.

Next Prev back to top WEEK 8.   THEME 4 — LOVE, LOYALTY & THE NATION'S FATE
11/07  
  • Yung (2010), The Flower Princess, A Cantonese Opera (Di Nü Hua)

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts from the opera and from film adaptations; discussion of the Ming-Qing transition and other operas set in that time period (e.g., The Peach Blossom Fan).
  • Due: One-page project proposal and select references

11/09  
  • Dolby (1978), Hegemon King Says Farewell to His Queen

  • Discussion in conjunction with video excerpts from the opera and from film adaptations.

Next Prev back to top WEEK 9.   THEME 5 — BEAUTY TRAPS & OTHER STRATEGIES
11/14  
  • Hung (1971), Two Men on a String
        (Lü Bu and Diao Chan, Phoenix Pavilion,
        A Stratagem of Interlocking Rings)

  • Synopses from representative operas and video excerpts of stories from the novel, Romance of the Three Kingdoms (e,g., on Cao Cao, Guan Yu, Zhuge Liang (Kong Ming), Zhou Yu, Liu Bei, Zhang Fei, etc.)
    . e.g. Jiang Gan Steals a Letter, Ruse of the Empty City, Borrowing Arrows.
11/16  
  • Xiao He: The Pillar of the Dynasty (Cheng-Bai Xiao He)

  • Other video excerpts from this historical period, such as Xiao He's pursuit of Han Xin under the moonlight, etc.

  • Synopses from representative operas and video excerpts for viewing and discussion


Next Prev back to top WEEK 10.   THEME 6 — SPIRITS & ROMANTIC ENCOUNTERS
11/21  
  • Mitchell (1973), The White Snake
    . Excerpt(s) for in-class reading, viewing and discussion

  • Synopses from other representative operas and video excerpts for viewing and discussion
11/23  
  • Episodes from The Carp Fairy, A Maid from Heaven, etc.

  • Synopses from some representative operas and video excerpts for viewing and discussion

Next Prev back to top WEEK 11.   FINAL WEEK ACTIVITIES
11/28  
  • Student Presentations
11/30  
  • Student Presentations

Prev back to top WEEK 12.   EXAM WEEK

Due: Term Paper/Final Project — Wednesday, 7 December 2011, 12:00 noon

Conventional Term Paper: Submit a digital copy in the Carmen Dropbox and
a hardcopy in 398 Hagerty Hall by Wednesday (7 December 2011), 12:00 noon.

Final Project in CarmenWiki (or alternative online site): Complete all additions, revisions, etc.,
by Wednesday (7 December 2011), 12:00 noon.

Due dates for term paper/final project for graduating seniors/grads:
  1. Conventional Term Paper: Submit your paper to the Carmen Dropbox by Thursday (1 December 2011), 11:59 p.m.
    (A hardcopy is optional, and due by Friday (2 December 2011), 12:00 noon, in 398 Hagerty Hall.)
  2. Final Project in CarmenWiki (or alternative online site): Complete all additions, revisions, etc., by Thursday (1 December 2011), 11:59 p.m.

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READINGS

TEXTBOOKS   (Available from Closed Reserve at Thompson (Main) Library)
  1. Bao, Chengjie and Juan Cao. 2002. Fascinating Stage Arts. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [PN2876.B37 X813 2003] [This book is catalogued in the OSU Libraries under a single author (Bao, Changjie); translators: He, Jun et al.]
  2. Yi, Bian (compiler). 2005. Peking Opera: The Cream of Chinese Culture. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [PN2876.B37 P45 2005]
ADDITIONAL READINGS   Asterisk (*) marks opera scripts that are translated into English. Noted also are videorecordings in VCD format of stage performances of the operas at Thompson Library (Main Library), as part of Thompson Libraries' video collection of East Asian DVDs & VCDs. Check also for individual opera titles listed on DVDs and DVD sets at Thompson Library, since these are not individually catalogued. In addition, many Chinese operas (Peking, Kunqu, and regional operas) -- full operas or scenes from operas -- are also available online at Youtube.com and other video websites.

Readings for this quarter's offering of Chinese 674 that are in PDF format and prepared by Ohio State Libraries' E-Reserve will be available at Carmen. Other course readings are on 2-hour loan from Thompson Library or downloadable as e-journal articles. For materials on Reserve at Thompson Library, check Ohio State University Libraries <library.osu.edu> under Quicklinks, and select either "Reserves by Course" or "Reserves by Professor" to obtain the list of books placed on Reserve for Chinese 674. To retrieve e-journal articles, go to EJC: OhioLINK Electronic Journal Center and conduct a simple search for the title of the e-journal, the author's name, or the title of the article. A more efficient method would be to select "All Search Options" and conduct an advanced (boolean) search; that is, conduct a search for a specific e-journal title AND the name of a specific author (i.e., limiting the search to a specific author within a specific e-journa), or conduct a search for a specific e-journal title AND the title of the specific article (i.e., limiting the search to a specific article title within a specific e-journal).

  1. Bonds, Alexandra B. 2008. Beijing Opera Costumes: The Visual Communication of Character and Culture. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press. [Excerpts: Chapter 1. "The World of Traditional Jingju" and Chapter 2. "The World of Traditional Jingju Costumes".]
  2. * Dolby, William. 1978. Eight Chinese Plays from the Thirteenth Century to the Present [Translated with an Introduction by William Dolby.] New York: Columbia University Press. [Excerpt: "Hegemon King Says Farewell to His Queen" (Ba-wang bie-ji / Bawang Bie Ji; a.k.a. 'Farewell My Concubine'). Peking Opera: Version performed by Mei Lanfang (1894-1961), pages 111-137.] [SUL VCDs (videorecording): Ba wang bie ji (霸王别姬)] [OSU Libraries have 2 copies, in addition to 22 copies in other OhioLINK libraries.]
  3. Goldstein, Joshua. 2007. Drama Kings: Players and Publics in the Re-creation of Peking Opera, 1870-1937. Berkeley: University of California Press. [Excerpts: Chapter 1. "Late Qing Institutions of Peking Opera" and Chapter 7. "The Gendering of National Culture, Or, The Only Good Woman Is a Man"] [OSU Libraries and 9 other OhioLINK libraries have this book.]
  4. * Hung, Josephine Huang. 1971. Classical Chinese Plays. Second edition. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications. [Excerpts: "The Price of Wine" (Mei Lung Chen / Meilong Zhen; a.k.a. Yu Lung Hsi Feng / You long Xi Feng), "The Faithful Harlot" (Yü T'ang Ch'un / Yu Tang Chun), and "Two Men on a String" (Feng Yi T'ing / Feng Yi Ting)]. (Note: The same five plays are in the first edition, entitled Children of the Pear Garden: Five Plays from the Chinese Opera, and published in 1961 in Taipei by Heritage Press.) [THO VCDs (videorecording): Mei long zhen (梅龙镇) / You long xi feng (游龙戏凤) — Yu tang chun (玉堂春) / Nv qi jie (女起解) / San tang hui shen (三堂会审) — Lv Bu yu Diao Chan (吕布与貂蝉)] [OSU Libaries and 13 other OhioLINK libraries have copies.]
  5. * Hung, Josephine. 1974. The Jewel Bag: A Chinese Classical Play. [A Traditional Chinese Play Translated and Adapted with an Introduction and Stage Directions.] Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, Inc. [Excerpt: Scenes 5 through 9.] [THO VCDs (videorecording): Suo lin nang (锁麟囊)] [This book is available through WorldCat. OhioLINK libraries do not own a copy.]
  6. Jiang, Jin. 2009. Women Playing Men: Yue Opera and Social Change in Twentieth-Century Shanghai. Seattle and London: University of Wshington Press. [Excerpts: Introduction. "Opera, Gender, and the City"; Chapter 1. "The Origins of Yue Opera"; Chapter 2. "The Rise of Feminine Opera."] [OSU Libraries do not own a copy, but 7 other OhioLINK libraries do.]
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  8. * Mitchell, John D. 1973. The Red Pear Garden: Three Great Dramas of Revolutionary China. Boston: David R. Godine. [Excerpt: "The White Snake" (Bai She Zhuan)] [THO VCDs (videorecording): Bai she zhuan (白蛇传)]
  9. * Scott, A. C. 1969. Traditional Chinese Plays. Volume 2. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. [Excerpts: "Introduction," "About the Play," and Scene 1 ("The Evil Deed of Lou the Rat"), from the Kunqu opera, "Fifteen Strings of Cash" (Shih Wu Kuan / Shi Wu Guan)] [THO VCDs (videorecording): Shi wu guan (十五贯)] [OSU Libraries and over 30 other OhioLINK libraries have volumes 1 through 3.]
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  11. * Scott, A. C. 1975. Traditional Chinese Plays. Volume 3. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. [Excerpts: "Picking Up the Jade Bracelet" (Shih yü-cho / Shi Yuzhuo) and "A Girl Setting Out for Trial" (Nü ch'i-chieh / Nü Qijie).] [THO VCDs (videorecording): Shi yu zhuo, fa men si (拾玉镯, 法门寺) — Nü qi jie (女起解) / Yu tang chun (玉堂春)] [OSU Libraries and over 30 other OhioLINK libraries have volumes 1 through 3.]
  12. * Yang, Gladys (translator). 1958. The Runaway Maid (A Cantonese Opera). [Revised by the Cantonese Opera Company of Kwangtung] Peking: Foreign Languages Press. (Translation of Sou Shuyuan 搜書院 (Searching the Academy).) [Available from WorldCat libraries, not from OhioLINK libraries.]
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  14. * Yang, Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang (Translators). 1956. The Fisherman's Revenge: A Peking Opera. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [An English translation is also available in Arlington and Acton (1937).] [THO VCDs (videorecording): Da yu sha jia (打渔杀家). (Note: a.k.a. Qing dingzhu (庆顶珠) / Tao yushui (讨渔税)] [OSU Libraries do not own this book but one OhioLINK library does.]
  15. * Yang, Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang (translators). 1958. The Forsaken Wife (A Pingju Opera). Peking: Foreign Languages Press. (Translation of Qin Xiang Lian.) [THO VCDs (videorecording): Qin Xianglian (Shou tang . Sha miao . Zha Mei) 秦香莲 (寿堂 . 杀庙 . 铡美). Also: THO VCDs (videorecording): 1955 Pingju opera film version.] [This book is available through WorldCat. OhioLINK libraries do not own a copy.]
  16. * Yung, Bell. 2010. The Flower Princess, A Cantonese Opera. Editor, Translator, and Author of "Introduction," with assistance in translation from Sonia Ng and Katherine Carlitz. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press. [This is an English translation of Tang Disheng's most well-known opera, Di Nü Hua (帝女花 'Princess Changping').] [Excerpts: "Introduction" and Act II ("The Calamity").] [Available from OSU Libraries and OhioLINK libraries.]
  17. Zheng, Lei (郑雷). 200x (no date). Zhongguo Kunqu (中國昆曲). China's Traditional Kunqu Opera. (Chief editors: Li, Xin and Husheng Li; translated into English by RB Baron; fully illustrated with color photos.) Beijing: Ministry of Culture, People's Republic of China. [Note: Produced by CAV Television Production Co., Ltd.; "Not for sale." Available from WorldCat.] [Excerpts: Chapter 1. "The Emergence and Development of Kunqu Opera" and Chapter 3. "Artistic Characteristics of Kunqu Opera".]
  18. (Opera synopses and short translation excerpts to accompany in-class video-viewing.)
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SOME SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS AND REFERENCES

(* Opera scripts translated into English)

  1. Alley, Rewi. 1984. Peking Opera. [Text by Rewi Alley. Pictures by Eva Siao, Weng Naiqiang, Zhang Zudao, Di Xianghua, and Others]. Beijing: New World Press.
  2. Arlington, L. C. (Lewis Charles). 1930. The Chinese Drama from the Earliest Times Until Today. [A panoramic study of the art in China, tracing its origin and describing its actors (in both male and female roles), their costumes and make-up, superstitions and stage slang, the accompanying music and musical instruments, concluding with synopses of thirty Chinese plays, by L.C. Arlington, with a Pien (匾) by Mei Lan-fang and a foreword by H.A. Giles, Ll.d. (Aberdeen).] Shanghai: Kelly and Walsh. [Re-issued in 1966. Bronx, NY: Benjamin Blom, Inc.]
  3. * Arlington, L.C. (Lewis Charles) and Harold Acton (editors and translators). 1937. Famous Chinese Plays. [Illustrated] Peiping (Beijing): Henri Vetch.
  4. * Birch, Cyril (translator). 2002. The Peony Pavilion. Mudan Ting, Second Edition. Translated with a new preface by Cyril Birch. Introduction to the second edition by Catherine Swatek. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.
  5. * Birch, Cyril (translator and editor). 2001. Mistress & Maid (Jiaohongji). By Meng Chengshun. New York: Columbia University Press. (The full title of the work, translated into English is: The Story of (Wang) Jiao(niang) and (Fei)hong and the Chastity and Integrity in the Mandarin-duck Tomb, or shortened to The Mandarin-duck Tomb, or simply, The Story of Jiao and Hong.)
  6. Bonds, Alexandra B. 2008. Beijing Opera Costumes: The Visual Communication of Character and Culture. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.
  7. * Chang, Donald K. and John D. Mitchell (translators). 1985. The Fox Cat Substituted for the Crown Prince: A Peking Opera Set in the Song Dynasty. (Translated and adapted by Donald K. Chang and John D. Mitchell.) [Li mao huan tai zi. (Unif title) Libretto. English & Chinese] Midland, MI: Northwood Institute Press.
  8. * Chen, Chih-hsiang and Harold Acton (translators). 1976. The Peach Blossom Fan (T'ao-hua-shan). By K'ung Shang-jen (1648-1718). Translated by ChenShih-hsiang and Harold Acton, with the collaboration of Cyril Birch. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London, UK: University of California Press. (Translation of Taohua Shan.)
  9. Chen, Xiaomei. 2002. Acting the Right Part: Political Theater and Popular Drama in Contemporary China. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.
  10. Duchesne, Isabelle (ed.). 2000. Red Boat on the Canal: Cantonese Opera in New York Chinatown. New York, NY: Museum of Chinese in the Americas.
  11. Guy, Nancy. 2005. Peking Opera and Politics in Taiwan. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.
  12. Halson, Elizabeth. 1966. Peking Opera: A Short Guide. Hong Kong and New York: Oxford University Press. (This book introduces Peking opera, including stagecraft, costumes, music, etc., as well as synopses of 15 operas.)
  13. * Hawkes, David (translator). 2003. Liu Yi and the Dragon Princess: A Thirteenth-Century Zaju Play by Shang Zhongxian. Translated and adapted by David Hawkes. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press.
  14. Ho, Virgil K.Y. 2005. Understanding Canton: Rethinking Popular Culture in the Republican Period. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. [Chapter 6. "Cantonese Opera as a Mirror of Society."] [OhioLINK: web e-book]
  15. * Hsiung, S.I. 1936. Lady Precious Stream: An Old Chinese Play Done into English According to Its Traditional Style. Acting Edition. (This Chinese drama was adapted and published in 1934, the year in which it was first staged in London, England. This Acting Edition was first published in June 1938.) London: Methuen & Co. Ltd. [Chinese title of the play: Wang Bao Chuan (王寶釧), a.k.a. Hong Zong Lie Ma (紅鬃烈馬)]
  16. * Hsiung, S.I. (translator). 1936 [1968]. The Romance of the Western Chamber. Reissued in 1968 for the Columbia College Program of Translations from the Oriental Classics. New York and London: Columbia University Press. (Translation of Xixiang Ji.)
  17. Huang, Alexander C. Y. 2009. Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
  18. Huang, Shang. 1985. Tales from Peking Opera. [Illustrations: Ma De]. Beijing: New World Press. (Narratives of twenty stories from well-known Peking operas, including: "Beauty Defies Tyranny", "The Pursuit of Han Xin", "The Capture and Release of Cao Cao", "The Ruse of the Empty City", "The Drunken Beauty", "The Fisherman's Revenge", "The Jade Bracelet", "A Startling Dream of Wandering Through the Garden", "The Four Successful Candidates", "Sister Thirteen", etc.)
  19. * Hung, Josephine Huang. 1971. Classical Chinese Plays. Second edition. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications. [Five plays: 1. "The Faithful Harlot" (Yü T'ang Ch'un / Yu Tang Chun); 2. "Two Men on a String" (Feng Yi T'ing / Feng Yi Ting); 3. "Twice a Bride" (Hung Luan Hsi / Hong Luan Xi; a.k.a. Chin Yu Nu / Jin Yu Nu); 4. "One Missing Head" (Chiu Keng T'ien / Jiu Geng Tian); 5. "The Price of Wine" (Mei Lung Chen / Meilong Zhen; a.k.a. Yu Lung Hsi Feng / You long Xi Feng)] (Note: The same five plays are in the first edition, entitled Children of the Pear Garden: Five Plays from the Chinese Opera, and published in 1961 in Taipei by Heritage Press.)
  20. * Hung, Josephine Huang. 1981. For Love and Justice: Chuan Chiao Chi Yuan. Translated, adapted and annotated by Josephine Huang Hung. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, Inc. [Note: Scenes 3 and 4 (minus the mother) of this full-length Peking opera (雙姣奇緣 / 法門寺) is often performed as a short, stand-alone opera, "Picking Up the Jade Bracelet" (拾玉镯). See Scott (1975), "Picking Up the Jade Bracelet."]
  21. * Hung, Josephine Huang. 1993. A Handful of Snow: A Traditional Chinese Play. Translated, adapted, and annotated, with an introduction, by Josephine Huang Hung. Taipei, Taiwan: Published by arrangement with Zhong Hwa Book Co.; Miami, Fla.: Meiya. [Yi p'ung hsueh (yi peng xue) 一捧雪, Li Yu 李玉.]
  22. Johnson, Elizabeth Lominska. 1996. Cantonese opera in its Canadian context: The contemporary vitality of an old tradition. Theatre Research in Canada / Recherches Théâtrales au Canada 17.1.24-45.
  23. Johnson, Elizabeth Lominska. 1997. Cantonese opera costumes in Canada. Arts of Asia 27.1.112-125. [Note: In 1994-1995, a travelling exhibition, A Rare Flower: A Century of Cantonese Opera in Canada, which was organized by Dr. Elizabeth Johnson (Museum of Anthropology (MOA), University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada), showcased a selection of costume pieces from MOA's collection of Cantonese opera costumes and accessories. The collection, one of the largest and oldest in the world, comprises more than 500 pieces that were preserved by Vancouver's Jin Wah Sing Musical Association. The collection — donated in large part by Jin Wah Sing, with additional pieces purchased by MOA — provides a rare glimpse into the history of Cantonese opera as an important performing art form among the Chinese in Canada from the 1880s until today. Some photos taken in summer 2006 from the MOA's collection (with Dr. Johnson's permission) will be presented in class during the quarter.]
  24. Kuang, Rong. 1982. Fifteen Strings of Cash. [Adapted by Kuang Rong; drawings by Wang Hongli; Shi wu guan. English & Chinese (unif title)] Beijing: Foreign Languages Press.
  25. Lee, Tong Soon. 2009. Chinese Street Opera in Singapore. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.
  26. Lei, Daphne Pi-Wei. 2006. Operatic China: Staging Chinese Identity Across the Pacific. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  27. Leung, George Kin. 1929. Mei Lan-fang, Foremost Actor of China. Shanghai: Commercial Press, Limited. [Includes information on stagecraft.]
  28. Li, Nianpei. 1987. Old Tales of China: A Book to Better Understanding of China's Stage, Cinema, Arts and Crafts. Illustrated by Pang Xiquan, Sun Yizeng and Li Binsheng. Singapore: Graham Brash Ptd Ltd. (1981 edition was published by China Travel and Tourism Press, and the 1982 edition by The Commercial Press.) (This book contains 40 synopses from Chinese opera, plus plots in Chinese opera that are based on scenes from A Dream of Red Mansions (Hong Lou Meng), and stories from The Romance of the Three Kingdoms (San Guo Yanyi), Water Margin (Shui Hu Zhuan), Pigrimage to the West (Xi You Ji), and The Yang Family of Generals (Yang Jia Jiang).)
  29. Li, Nianpei (translator and editor). 1988. The Beating of the Dragon Robe: A Repertoire of Beijing Opera Synopses of 100 Most Popular Pieces. Illustrated by Dong Chensheng. Co-published by Joint Publishing (H.K.) Co., Ltd., Hong Kong, and China Travel and Tourism Press, Beijing.
  30. * Li, Shau Chwun. 1976. Wild Boar Forest. [Annotated and Edited by Donald Chang and John D. Mitchell.] Midland, MI: Northwood Institute. (This is an introduction to one of the best known Peking operas, and is intended for American learners of Chinese. The textbook uses Simplified Chinese characters and provides Yale romanization and English glosses in the vocabulary items placed as footnotes on the page for easy reference. The book also provides information on the opera (viz., brief introduction to Peking opera, synopsis of the opera, and the characters in the opera, the protagonist being Lin Chong, one of the heroes of beloved novel, The Water Margin (a.k.a. Outlaws of the Marsh and All Men are Brothers). An English translation of the opera is also available; see reference below to Mitchell (1973).)
  31. Li, Siu Leung [Edward Siu-leung]. 2003. Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.
  32. Li, Xiao (李晓). 2005. Chinese Kunqu Opera (中国昆曲). Translated into English by Li Li and Liping Zhang. South San Francisco: Long River Press; Shanghai: Shanghai Press and Pub. Dev. Co. (The original 2004 Chinese edition was published by Shanghai's Baijia Chubanshe.) (History of kunqu opera from the early 14th century to the present, with numerous b/w and color photos.)
  33. Lowe, H. Y. 1942. Stories from Chinese Drama. With illustrations by the author. Peking (Beijing): Peking Chronicle Press. (This voluminous work (with close to a total of 500 pages, including introduction, index, etc.) narrates the plots of 202 of the most well-known Peking operas. Opera titles are given in Chinese characters and in English translation.)
        [Note: This book was re-published later in Taiwan under a different author, a slightly different title, and a different publisher, with no apparent acknowledgment of the true source of the work: Gee, Tom. 1978. Stories of Chinese Opera. Taipei: Liberal Arts Press.]
  34. * Lu, Lisa (translator). 1980. The Romance of the Jade Bracelet and Other Chinese Operas. Freely translated by Lisa Lu, with an Appreciation by Harold Acton and a Foreword by S.I. Hsiung. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, Inc.
  35. * Ma, Qian (translator). 2005. Women in Traditional Chinese Theater: The Heroine's Play. Lanham, MD: University Press of America. [Six plays including "Injustice to Dou E" (Dou E Yuan), "Mu Lan" (Ci Mulan) and "The Girl Who Marries a Princess" (Nü Fuma), the latter a huangmei opera.]
  36. Mackerras, Colin. 1975. The Chinese Theatre in Modern Times: From 1840 to the Present Day. London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd.
  37. Mackerras, Colin. 1990. Chinese Drama: A Historical Survey. Beijing: New World Press. [Excerpts: Chapter IV. "The Pihuang System and the Peking Opera, Eighteenth-Nineteenth Centuries" and Chapter V. "Society and Drama, Twelfth-Nineteenth Centuries."] [OSU Libraries do not own a copy, but 2 other OhioLINK libraries have it.]
  38. Mackerras, Colin. 1997. Peking Opera. [Images of Asia series.] Hong Kong: Oxford University Press (China) Ltd. (This is a brief introduction to Peking opera and is intended for the general reader. It contains some historical color photos and includes a final chapter, "How is the Peking Opera Doing Nowadays," updating information that is in his (1975) book.)
  39. * Mitchell, John D. 1973. The Red Pear Garden: Three Great Dramas of Revolutionary China. Boston: David R. Godine. {Includes: "The White Snake" (Bai She Zhuan) and "The Wild Boar Forest" (Ye Zhu Lin)]
  40. Mou, Sherry J. 2009. A child for all ages: The Orphan of Zhao. Education About Asia 14.1.23-28.
  41. * Mulligan, Jean. 1980. The Lute. Kao Ming's P'i-p'a chi. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. (Translation of Pipa Ji.)
  42. Pan, Xiafeng. 1995. The Stagecraft of Peking Opera: From Its Origins to the Present Day. Beijing: New World Press.
  43. Regional Council, Hong Kong. 1988. Yue Ju Fu Shi [粵劇服飾]. (= Costumes of Cantonese Opera). Hong Kong: Regional Council, Hong Kong. (Exhibition catalogue with Chinese-English bilingual text; preface by the Curator, Regional Council Museums, Hong Kong.)
  44. Scott, A. C. 1958. An Introduction to the Chinese Theatre. With drawings by the author. Singapore: Donald Moore. (Includes techniques and other stagecraft, and narratives of twenty plays.)
  45. * Scott, A. C. 1967. Traditional Chinese Plays. Volume 1. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. [Two plays: "Ssu Lang Visits his Mother" (Ssu Lang T'an Mu / Si Lang Tan Mu) and "The Butterfly Dream" (Hu Tieh Meng / Hudie Meng)]
  46. * Scott, A. C. 1969. Traditional Chinese Plays. Volume 2. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. [Two plays: "Longing for Worldly Pleasures" (Ssu Fan / Si Fan) and "Fifteen Strings of Cash" (Shih Wu Kuan / Shi Wu Guan)]
  47. Scott, A. C. 1983. The Performance of Classical Theater. In: Colin Mackerras (editor), Chinese Theater: From Its Origins to the Present Day. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Pages 118-144. [OSU Libraries have 4 copies; 27 other OhioLINK libraries have copies. Three other OhioLINK libraries have a 1988 edition.]
  48. * Shih, Chung-wen. 1972. Injustice to Tou O (Tou O Yüan): A Study and Translation. By Hanqing Guan. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  49. Siu, Wang-Ngai (with Peter Lovrick). 1997. Chinese Opera: Images and Stories. Vancouver, Canada: UBC Press; Seattle: U. of Washington Press. [Excerpt: Chapter 2. "Regional Opera Styles".] [OSU Libraries and 10 other OhioLINK libraries have this book.]
  50. Stock, Jonathan P.J. 2003. Huju: Traditional Opera in Modern Shanghai. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Published for The British Academy.)
  51. Sun, Jie. 2000. Peking Opera Painted Faces — With Notes on 200 Operas. [Text by Zhao Menglin and Yan Jiqing. Drawings by Zhao Menglin]. Fourth edition. Beijing: Morning Glory Publishers. [Illustrations of the painted faces and the notes on the operas are online at Peking Opera Masks]
  52. Tan Gudnason, Jessica and Li Gong. 2001. Chinese Opera. New York: Abbeville Press. (Photographs by Jessica Tan Gudnason; text by Li Gong (the actress in such well-known films as Farewell My Concubine and The Emperor and the Assassin). This is mainly a "coffee-table" book that consists of illustrations — mostly close-ups (for a detailed look at the make-up and headdress) and portraits of performers in their colorful and elaborate costumes; performers are from Peking and Cantonese opera troupes as well as all-female, Wu-dialect Yue opera troupes from Shanghai.)
  53. Thorpe, Ashley. 2007. The Role of the Chou ("Clown") in Traditional Chinese Drama: Comedy, Criticism, and Cosmology on the Chinese Stage. Lewiston, NY and Queenston, Canada: Edwin mellen Press.
  54. * Wang, Ben. 2009. Laughter and Tears: Translation of Selected Kunqu Dramas. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. [Note: A request has been submitted to OSU Libraries to purchase this book.]
  55. * Wang, Elizabeth Te-Chen. 1971. Snow Elegant. A Chinese Classical Play. Translated and Adapted by Elizabeth Te-Chen Wang from the Opera "Feng Huan Ch'ao" (Feng Huan Chao) by Chi Yu-shan. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, Inc.
  56. * West, Stephen H. and Wilt L. Idema (editors and translators). 1995. The Story of the Western Wing. By Wang Shifu. (A 100-page introduction by Stephen H. West and Wilt L. Idema.) Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London, UK: University of California Press. (Translation of Xixiang Ji.)
  57. * West, Stephen H. and Wilt L. Idema. 2010. Monks, Bandits, Lovers, and Immortals: Eleven Early Chinese Plays. Edited and translatted, with an introduction, by Stephen H. West and Wilt L. Idema. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
  58. Wichmann, Elizabeth. 1991. Listening to Theatre: The Aural Dimension of Beijing Opera. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.
  59. Wu, Zuguang, Zuolin Huang, and Shaowu Mei. 1981. Peking Opera and Mei Lanfang: A Guide to China's Traditional Theatre and the Art of its Great Master. Beijing: New World Press. (Includes an Appendix: Synopses of 25 Peking Operas.)
  60. Xu, Chengbei. 2003. Peking Opera. [Cultural China Series.] (Translated by Chen Gengtao; fully illustrated with historical photos and color photos.) San Francisco: Long River Press.
  61. Xu, Chengbei. 2005. An Afternoon Tea of Beijing Opera Tidbits. [Cultural China Series.] (Translated from the Chinese by Yawtsong Lee; fully illustrated with color photos.) San Francisco: Long River Press.
  62. * Yang, Gladys (translator). 1958. The Runaway Maid (A Cantonese Opera). [Revised by the Cantonese Opera Company of Kwangtung] Peking: Foreign Languages Press. (Translation of Sou Shuyuan (Searching the Academy).)
  63. * Yang, Hsien-yi (= Yang, Xianyi) and Gladys Yang (translators). 1956. Love Under the Willows (A Szechuan Opera). (Unif Title: Liang Shan-po yü Chu Ying-t'ai) Peking: Foreign Languages Press.
  64. * Yang, Hsien-yi (= Yang, Xianyi) and Gladys Yang (translators). 1962. Third Sister Liu (An Opera in Eight Scenes). Peking: Foreign Languages Press. (This is a caidiao (color tune) opera from northern Guangxi based on a Zhuang minority folk legend. It was revised and made into a film in 1959. In addition, there is a 1978 film version that reflects the opera much more closely.)
  65. * Yang, Xianyi and Gladys Yang (translators). 1955/1980. The Palace of Eternal Youth. By Hong Sheng. First Edition: 1955; second edition: 1980. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press. (Translation of Changsheng Dian.)
  66. Ye, Tan. 2008. Historical Dictionary of Chinese Theater. [Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts, No. 27] Landham, Maryland; Toronto; Plymouth, UK: The Scarecrow Press, Inc. [Note: This hardcover book has the same content as the paperback edition, published by Scarecrow Pressr and sporting a different title, The A to Z of Chinese Theater, and placed in a different series, The A to Z Guide Series, No. 182.]
  67. Yeh, Catherine Vance. 2004. Where is the Center of Cultural Production? The Rise of the Actor to National Stardom and the Beijing / Shanghai Challenge (1860s-1910s). Late Imperial China 25.2.74-118. [E-journal article]
  68. Yim, Shui-yuen (editor). 1989. Yue Ju Bai Nian Tui Bian [粵劇百年蜕變] (= A Century of Cantonese Opera). Hong Kong: Regional Council, Hong Hong Kong. (Exhibition catalogue with Chinese-English bilingual text.)
  69. * Yu, Shiao-ling S. (Editor and translator). 1996. Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989: An Anthology. Eited and translated, with an introduction by Shiao-Ling S. Yu. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen. (In addition to spoken drama, the book contains new versions of two traditional operas.)
  70. Yung, Bell. 1989. Cantonese Opera: Performance as Creative Process. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  71. Zheng, Lei (郑雷). 200- (no date). Zhongguo Kunqu (中國昆曲). China's Traditional Kunqu Opera. (Chief editors: Li, Xin and Husheng Li; translated into English by RB Baron; fully illustrated with color photos.) Beijing: Ministry of Culture, People's Republic of China. [Note: Produced by CAV Television Production Co., Ltd.; "Not for sale." Available from WorldCat.]
  72. Zung, Cecilia S. L. 1937. Secrets of the Chinese Drama: A Complete Explanatory Guide to Actions and Symbols as Seen in the Performance of Chinese Dramas. [With Synopses of Fifty Popular Chinese Plays and 240 Illustrations]. Shanghai: Kelly and Walsh. [Re-issued in 1964. New York: Benjamin Blom.]
  73. Note:   In Hong Kong, some of the well-known Chinese operas were transported from the stage to the film studio in the mid-1950's to the 1970's by Shaw Brothers. The Shaw productions were huangmei (yellow plum) opera films that had wide appeal; they were in color, with Mandarin Chinese dialogues and singing using popular film stars, and contained English and Chinese subtitles. During the first decade of the new century, many of Shaw Brothers huangmei opera films were remastered. These include The Story of Sue San (Yu Tang Chun), Return of the Phoenix (Feng Huan Chao), The Kingdom and the Beauty (Jiangshan Meiren), The Love Eterne (Liang Shanbo yu Zhu Yingtai), Madam White Snake (Bai She Zhuan), The Bride Napping (Hua Tian Cuo), The Mermaid (Yu Meiren), Lady General Hua Mu-lan (Hua Mulan), The Crimson Palm (Xie Shou Yin), The Female Prince (Shuang Feng Qi Yuan), The Grand Substitution (Wan Gu Liu Fang (i.e., The Orphan of the Zhao Family)), The Butterfly Chalice (Hudie Bei), etc. Before shifting entirely to martial arts films, Shaw Brothers also experimented with a few other regional opera styles, such as their 1977 remake of The Dream of the Red Chamber (Jinyu Liangyuan Hongloumeng) and their still more adventuresome, 1976 opera film, Farewell to a Warrior (Ci Lang Zhou), which was produced in the Chaozhou (Southern Min) dialect.

    Hong Kong also produced an enormous quantity of Cantonese opera films (mainly in black and white, with no subtitles or subtitles for the arias only) that targeted the local Cantonese-speaking population, particularly just after WWII. In the 1950's alone, over 500 opera films were produced, constituting a third of Hong Kong's total production of films in Cantonese. (Source: Cantonese Opera Film Retrospective, revised edition, 2003).

    The People's Republic of China have also produced quite a few traditional Chinese opera films that include regional forms, some of which are available from the Thompson (Main) Library in VCD format. (In other words, both videorecordings of stage performances and film productions of Chinese operas are available from Thompson Library. The Chinese opera video collection was built up over the past few years by our Chinese Studies Librarian, Professor Guoqing Li, to support Ohio State teaching and research, including the offering of this Chinese Opera course in Winter Quarter 2005, the impetus for the development and growth of this video collection.)

    In addition, over the years, there has been tremendous interest in making Chinese operas available for viewing online, including not only Peking and Kunqu operas, but numerous regional operas as well. While still very rare, some of these operas have English subtitles, thereby reaching a still broader audience.

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Marjorie Chan's Chinese 674: Chinese Opera (Autumn 2011)
<http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c674.htm> [Accessed   <DATE> ]

Orignally created on 23 October 2004 for Winter Quarter 2005 for the first offering of the course by the current instructor, with the most recent major revision on 23 August 2011 for Autumn Quarter 2011.
Last update: 7 November 2011.

The Chinese 674 logo at the top of this course syllabus is a scene from a Peking opera, Zhao Shi Gu'er (趙氏孤兒 'Orphan of the Zhao Family'). The small brush paintings on this webpage, by Ma De (高马得), depict scenes from several different Peking operas. They were scanned and prepared for this course syllabus from two books: Peking Opera (1984) and Shang Huang's Tales from Peking Opera (1985), both published by New World Press, Beijing, China. Additional images are available at the Cultural China - Opera site. Peking Opera (1984) is also the source for the photograph of the hegemon king, Xiang Yu (a painted face role), in Bawang Bie Ji (霸王别姬 'Farewell My Concubine'). The images of the textbbook covers had also been scanned for this course syllabus. The grey papercut of a general in battle gear, used as background, was prepared from a color papercut at <flickr.com>.

Copyright © 2004-201x Marjorie K.M. Chan. All rights reserved on course syllabus and on-line materials developed for the course. If you have difficulty accessing any portion of this web page or need the information in an alternative format, please contact the instructor at <chan.9at.symbolosu.edu>.

URL:     http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c674.htm   (archived URL)
              New Course Number: http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/chan9/c5474.htm   (semester system)
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